About Brad Hoggan


    In the Northeasternmost corner of the state if Utah, the town of Logan is snugly tucked between the mighty Wasatch Mountain Range to the east and the gentle Logan River to the west. At its heart lies one of America's premier racing pigeon lofts. His competitors know Brad Hoggan as being a down-to-earth, no-nonsense fancier whose name can always be found on the front page.

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    Before I met Brad, I knew him by reputation. I knew a guy that knew a guy in Utah that was dominating everybody at the club an concourse level. I thought, Come on—this guy surely is exaggerating about his results, as no one can sweep races with 1000-plus birds each and every week!

    Sometime later, I had the pleasure of meeting Brad and found out for myself that what everyone was saying about him was true. Brad is certainly a champion and a force to be reckoned with. I sat down with [him]and asked him some candid questions about his lofts, birds, and system of racing, which I'm sure we can all learn from and enjoy reading about.

    Brad was born in the cowtown of Preston, Idaho in September 1952. There he grew up and had his first contact with pigeons—namely rollers. His interests in girls and fast cars outgrew his love for his rollers and, consequently, they fell farther and farther down his interest list and eventually were disposed of.

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    Over the following years, Brad served a two-year mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, married his beautiful high school sweetheart, Cathy, and started their family of four wonderful children—Jared, Jillian, Jana, and Lance. Obviously, Brad was busy and it was quite a while before pigeons came back into Brad's life.

    In 1989, Brad's oldest son, who was nine years old at the time, brought home six pure white homing pigeons. This reintroduction of pigeons set off an unbelievable chain reaction that has carried Brad around the world and into the winners' circle time after time.

    Brad and his son, Jared, went to work building a loft to house the six white homers during the spring of 1989. Yet, after much care and love, all six homers were lost on the first young bird race—much to their dismay. However, a couple of very nice brothers, Royce and Hal Lundberg, gave the father and son a new team of birds, for which the duo has always been grateful.

    During this time of reintroduction, Brad was building his company—Plastic Extrusion—working long, hard hours, and raising his family. He eventually sold his business to pursue his other job as a cattle rancher. Brad started his cattle operation in 1968 and grew his Registered Black Polled Simmental Cattle to a herd of 75 to 100 cows. Like his plastics company, he sold out in 2002 to start yet another business venture—AAA Glass and Auto Sales—with his son, Jared.

    Being an astute businessman, Brad began to write letters to Holland and eventually was able to travel there to meet with and learn from the legendary Henk Kuijlarrs. From that meeting, Brad was introduced to other notable fanciers, such as Piet Valk, Jan Kuijzer, Jan and Karen de Haan, Kees Blecker, Dick Marjnissen, Klass Drent, Wim van Elsland, and many others. All of these fanciers—big or small, famous or no—gave Brad an understanding of how to maintain a top stud of racing pigeons and dominate the competition year after year.

    Brad has masterfully applied what he learned from these fanciers and from his own experiences in both raising and racing techniques. His current and most modern loft was constructed in 2001—the result of much carefulplanning and hard work—and features0 segregated lofting under one roof, heated flooring, and automatic ventilation. Soon it will include a vacuum system for convenience in cleaning. Brad will do no less than the best for the birds he cares for, and because of his dedication and hard work, results like [his] are not a one-time flash in the pan for Brad. He dominates in young birds and old birds alike. He stresses, however, that you cannot win on a regular basis if you are not willing to put in the effort. The birds brought into perfect health and which are motivated correctly and at the right time will bring home handfuls of diplomas for you.

    Much more could be written about Brad Hoggan of Logan, Utah. After having visited him on several occasions, I am continually impressed with his unequalled depth of knowledge about the sport. Brad is a dedicated flier and a true American Legend. I have learned a great deal from Brad and can say with certainty that the skies above Logan are truly full of Diamonds.